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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had my RC 350 F sport almost a week and noticed this at the dealer, but the salesman passed it off as "necessary to let heat out" even tho were in the middle of winter, but does anyone's passenger window go down 1/4" when you open the door and go back up when you close the door? It's an annoying thing and I haven't been able to find any info on it, so hoping someone here can explain why it's designed to do this and how to cut off this feature.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Another twist

Today, for the very first time, the DRIVER's side window did the exact same thing! Whaazzzzuuuup!?
 

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Had my RC 350 F sport almost a week and noticed this at the dealer, but the salesman passed it off as "necessary to let heat out" even tho were in the middle of winter, but does anyone's passenger window go down 1/4" when you open the door and go back up when you close the door? It's an annoying thing and I haven't been able to find any info on it, so hoping someone here can explain why it's designed to do this and how to cut off this feature.

Salespeople normally don't know much about the all in /outs of every car model they sell, and yours is certainly showing that. ;)


The windows do roll down 1/4" as to not break the glass when the door is first opened or when it is closed. If you look at the glass, and then the body frame the body frame extends down past the glass to make a better seal. You can't change that, and if you do somehow you'll probably wind up with a broken window.


Hope that helped.
 

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Yea I don't think this is to let out air for temperature, but I do notice that many cars do this. I think it is to avoid the glass making contact with the door frame if you slam the door shut as that could result in the window smashing.
 

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Salespeople normally don't know much about the all in /outs of every car model they sell, and yours is certainly showing that. ;)


The windows do roll down 1/4" as to not break the glass when the door is first opened or when it is closed. If you look at the glass, and then the body frame the body frame extends down past the glass to make a better seal. You can't change that, and if you do somehow you'll probably wind up with a broken window.


Hope that helped.
That's why I always recommend to ask a service advisor, tech... the **** CAR JOCKEYS know more at times. Sometimes those guys are the most passionate about these... just look at what some of them drive.
 

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I have to say that it is unclear what the real harm is to the windows doing this. if you knew why they do it, would that make it less annoying to you?
 

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Most new cars that are 2 doors and do not have a window frame automatically roll down. Heck, even my old 2011 Camaro did that.
 

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A bit of background on the Windows rolling down

For the longest time , I also thought it was to release the air pressure so that the Windows "don't break" from the impact. There is a bit of truth to that and here is how it breaks down as far as I understand.
Frameless Windows lack the positive contact to the seal upon closing. Have you ever noticed, if you grab the edge of the glass to try and close the door (which you should never do) the window flexes . Now imagine closing the door without it rolling down, the surface area of the door and glass will push a lot of air inside the car increasing the pressure. Its like swinging a big piece of cardboard through the air . The faster you swing it the harder it is to move all that air trapped in front of it. The same with your door, the pressure will try to escape and push against the window at the point of contact. At that point two things would happen .
1. The door would be slightly harder to close/require more effort .
2. You wouldn't get a good seal between window and seal . Because of the "burp" of air , the window would contact twice and only in one direction (perpendicular to the seal) and that isn't the best type of seal .

Thus .... It leads us to the window rolling down :

1 it lets built up pressure quickly escape so that the effort required to close the door is always the same
2 it prevents the little burp and weak seal contact
3 when the window finally rolls back up, it creates a positive seal as it pushes up and into the seal . The final result is one by where the seal isn't only pressed up against the glass but also ridding over the edge slightly . This effect doesn't have to be great , meaning you won't see it from the outside


Anywho ... I hope that helps

I will introduce myself soon , my appolagies for not doing it before this post . I felt compelled to answer this question :)
 
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